Scholars today generally agree that cremation probably began in any real sense during the early Stone Age – around 3000 B.C. – and most likely in Europe and the Near East.

During the late Stone Age cremation began to spread across Northern Europe as evidenced by finds of decorative urns in Western Russia among the Slavic peoples. With the advent of the Bronze Age, 2500 – 1500 BC, cremation moved into the British Isles and into what is now Spain & Portugal. Cemeteries for cremation developed in Hungary and northern Italy, spreading to Northern Europe and Ireland.

In the Mycenaean Age – circa 1000 B.C. – cremation became an integral part of the elaborate Grecian burial custom. In fact, it became the dominant mode of disposition by the time of Homer in 800 B.C. and was actually encouraged for reasons of health and expedient burial of slain warriors in this battle ravaged country. Following this Grecian trend, the early Romans probably embraced cremation some time around 600 B.C. and it apparently became so prevalent that an official decree had to be issued in the mid 5th century against the cremation of bodies within the city.

By theScholars today generally agree that cremation probably began in any real sense during the early Stone Age – around 3000 B.C. – and most likely in Europe and the Near East.

During the late Stone Age cremation began to spread across Northern Europe as evidenced by finds of decorative urns in Western Russia among the Slavic peoples. With the advent of the Bronze Age, 2500 – 1500 BC, cremation moved into the British Isles and into what is now Spain & Portugal. Cemeteries for cremation developed [...]